An apple a day really does keep the doctor away, particularly for those struggling with high blood pressure. In addition to the 4.5 grams of blood pressure-lowering fiber you’ll get from each apple, you’ll also enjoy a healthy helping of quercetin, which has been deemed an effective antihypertensive, according to the results of a study conducted at the University Complutense of Madrid School of Medicine.
They may not have been a tempting option to you as a kid, but lima beans are a wonder food for anyone trying to get their blood pressure under control. According to research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, adding beans to your diet can help you get your blood pressure into a healthy range while keeping you full, making you less likely to reach for sugary or salty snacks that can cause your blood pressure to soar.
As if you didn’t need another reason to drink more berry-filled smoothies. A study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found compounds in blueberries protect against high blood pressure. If you’re not a fan of blueberries, these compounds are also found in raspberries, strawberries, and black currents, ScienceDaily reports. The effect was higher in those who ate blueberries over strawberries, though, so choose these if you have the option.
If beets aren’t already a part of your diet, you should consider adding them in. WebMD explains this mighty root veggie may actually have an immediate effect on your blood pressure — particularly when it comes to the juice. A study found drinking beet juice lowered systolic blood pressure by about 4-5 points. And researchers are hopeful that long-term beet juice consumption would bring about even better results.
Flexibility is key: Of course this plan cannot meet all your individual needs, so if there is an ingredient you don’t eat then replace it or leave it out. If you don’t normally eat breakfast, then leave it out. If you eat between meals, then have more than one snack. Also it pays off to batch prepare several meals ahead of time so you can simply reheat and go. This can be done for breakfasts, lunches and dinners.

They may not be great for your breath, but when it comes to your blood pressure, onions can’t be beat. Onions are a great source of quercetin, which a study in the British Journal of Nutrition found effective at lowering blood pressure in overweight and obese study subjects suffering from hypertension and pre-hypertension. To make your onions less pungent, try sautéing them in olive oil for a sweeter flavor and a boost of heart-healthy fat.
Ditching burgers and steak for good is a tall order for meat lovers. But if you can find ways to swap it for chicken more often than not, you’ll be doing yourself a favor. According to the AHA, chicken has less cholesterol and saturated fat than red meats. Seeing as how cholesterol and saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and make heart disease worse, this difference really does matter. Stick to lean, skinless cuts of chicken.
High blood pressure or hypertension is a condition caused when the systolic blood pressure rises to 140 and above, and diastolic blood pressure rises to 90 and above. There are several factors like stress, obesity, smoking, irregular lifestyle, certain diseases, etc., that can cause high blood pressure. People suffering from hypertension should look for measures to lower it immediately or it can lead to several complications like heart diseases and heart attack. Although there are medications available in the market, one should look for natural methods and also make changes in the lifestyle to lower high blood pressure naturally. Following a diet is one such effective method.
In addition to being good for those with arthritis, due to its anti-inflammatory properties, olive oil is loaded with heart-healthy fats. According to Mayo Clinic, the healthy fats found in olive oil are monounsaturated fatty acids. These healthy fats can help lower total cholesterol, along with LDL (bad) cholesterol. The Arthritis Foundation recommends 2 to 3 tablespoons daily, and points out that extra-virgin olive oil is a better option, as it isn’t as heavily processed.
They may not have been a tempting option to you as a kid, but lima beans are a wonder food for anyone trying to get their blood pressure under control. According to research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, adding beans to your diet can help you get your blood pressure into a healthy range while keeping you full, making you less likely to reach for sugary or salty snacks that can cause your blood pressure to soar.
Ditching burgers and steak for good is a tall order for meat lovers. But if you can find ways to swap it for chicken more often than not, you’ll be doing yourself a favor. According to the AHA, chicken has less cholesterol and saturated fat than red meats. Seeing as how cholesterol and saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and make heart disease worse, this difference really does matter. Stick to lean, skinless cuts of chicken.
There’s good news for pomegranate lovers — a recent study suggests the juice from the fruit can really help out those with high blood pressure. HuffPost reports researchers at Queen Margaret University in Scotland found the majority of those tested who drank 16 ounces of pomegranate juice a day for four weeks experienced lowered blood pressure. And that’s not all the researchers found. It turns out the juice from those tiny seeds also has tons of antioxidants, which are great for your heart.
As if you didn’t need another reason to drink more berry-filled smoothies. A study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found compounds in blueberries protect against high blood pressure. If you’re not a fan of blueberries, these compounds are also found in raspberries, strawberries, and black currents, ScienceDaily reports. The effect was higher in those who ate blueberries over strawberries, though, so choose these if you have the option.
Leafy greens, like spinach and kale, may help reduce blood pressure, thanks to magnesium. Research has found taking 300 milligrams of the mineral a day for one month can elevate blood magnesium levels and reduce blood pressure. Furthermore, a press release on the research reads, “High magnesium levels in the blood were linked to improvements in blood flow, another factor associated with lowered blood pressure.” Additional foods that are high in magnesium include whole grains, beans, and nuts.

Nuts contain heart-healthy omega-3 fats, so there’s little argument about their importance in a diet focused on lowering high blood pressure. Additionally, SFGate says certain nuts could lower cholesterol, which is often a huge offender among those with high blood pressure. So, whether you prefer pistachios to walnuts, snacking on these staples will help keep your heart healthy.
Hypertension, or high blood pressure, refers to the pressure of blood against your artery walls. Over time, high blood pressure can cause blood vessel damage that leads to heart disease, kidney disease, stroke, and other problems. Hypertension is sometimes called the silent killer because it produces no symptoms and can go unnoticed — and untreated — for years.

Ever wonder how to lower blood pressure naturally? Sodium has always been the blood pressure bogeyman—shake most of it from your high blood pressure diet and you'll be safe. But research now shows that it's just as important to choose foods naturally low in sodium and high in at least two of the three power minerals: calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Add in these 13 well-balanced foods to your diet to cut your risk of stroke and heart attack nearly in half. 

Leafy greens, like spinach and kale, may help reduce blood pressure, thanks to magnesium. Research has found taking 300 milligrams of the mineral a day for one month can elevate blood magnesium levels and reduce blood pressure. Furthermore, a press release on the research reads, “High magnesium levels in the blood were linked to improvements in blood flow, another factor associated with lowered blood pressure.” Additional foods that are high in magnesium include whole grains, beans, and nuts.
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