High blood pressure or hypertension is a condition caused when the systolic blood pressure rises to 140 and above, and diastolic blood pressure rises to 90 and above. There are several factors like stress, obesity, smoking, irregular lifestyle, certain diseases, etc., that can cause high blood pressure. People suffering from hypertension should look for measures to lower it immediately or it can lead to several complications like heart diseases and heart attack. Although there are medications available in the market, one should look for natural methods and also make changes in the lifestyle to lower high blood pressure naturally. Following a diet is one such effective method.
Making some stuffed peppers for dinner tonight could be the first step on a journey toward a healthier heart and lower blood pressure. Bell peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C, with more of the potent antioxidant than even citrus fruits, which has been shown to improve cardiac function and lower blood pressure. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals that loading up on vitamin C reduced blood pressure by 5 millimeters of mercury in patients with hypertension, making these versatile veggies a smart addition to any meal plan.
Nuts contain heart-healthy omega-3 fats, so there’s little argument about their importance in a diet focused on lowering high blood pressure. Additionally, SFGate says certain nuts could lower cholesterol, which is often a huge offender among those with high blood pressure. So, whether you prefer pistachios to walnuts, snacking on these staples will help keep your heart healthy.
As obesity is one of the major causes of hypertension, it is essential to get rid of obesity and watch your weight. In order to maintain a healthy weight, following a proper diet is essential. Certain foods like fried foods, fatty foods, marinated and buttered foods, sweets, etc., should not be consumed as they increase the level of cholesterol in the body and lead to obesity. Secondly, foods containing high amounts of sodium like salty foods, chips, fried foods, crisps, preserved foods, smoked and canned meats, sauces, pickles, etc., also tend to increase blood pressure, and hence, should be excluded from the diet or consumed in limited amounts.
High-fiber whole grains, especially oatmeal, have been linked to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that just three servings of whole grains a day can decrease your risk of heart disease by 15 percent. Oatmeal for breakfast is a great way to start your day with whole grains. Add whole-wheat bread at lunch and quinoa, barley, or brown rice at dinner
They may not have been a tempting option to you as a kid, but lima beans are a wonder food for anyone trying to get their blood pressure under control. According to research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, adding beans to your diet can help you get your blood pressure into a healthy range while keeping you full, making you less likely to reach for sugary or salty snacks that can cause your blood pressure to soar.
Don’t deprive yourself of your favorite sweet treats just because you’re trying to lower your blood pressure. Mangoes are a great source of both fiber and beta-carotene, both of which have been deemed effective at lowering blood pressure. In fact, research published in Current Hypertension Reports suggests that adding beta-carotene-rich foods to your diet may be an effective way to lower blood pressure in no time. Not a fan of raw mangoes? Try freezing and blending them for a tasty homemade sorbet that’s perfect for those hot summer days.
Legumes aren’t half bad, either. One study examined the role these fiber-rich foods play in controlling blood pressure among patients with diabetes. In a press release, lead study author Dr. David Jenkins said legumes have a “blood pressure-lowering effect in diabetic patients.” Not to mention, legumes are a great source of protein. Check out these delicious recipes, all starring the mighty bean.
She cleared out the sugary snacks and stocked up on fruit and vegetables. The Sun (2014)In five months it will be a bar with snacks. Times, Sunday Times (2014)You are then less likely to snack. The Sun (2015)Putting together simple snacks like these is what a slightly longer weekend is all about. Times, Sunday Times (2015)The lively bar offers a range of snacks and light bites. Times, Sunday Times (2008)Their mum provides a constant diet of sweet snacks and fizzy drinks between meals. Times, Sunday Times (2011)The anorexic will need to eat regular meals with healthy snacks between each meal. Wilkinson, Helena Beyond Chaotic Eating (1993)The flowers are in the vase and the snack food is in the fridge. The Sun (2010)Here are three easy snack ideas to help the party along. The Sun (2015)It will keep you feeling full until lunchtime so you will be less likely to snack. The Sun (2016)
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 75 million Americans have high blood pressure. Many risk factors for high blood pressure are out of your control, such as age, family history, gender, and race. But there are also factors you can control, such as exercise and diet. A diet that can help control blood pressure is rich in potassium, magnesium, and fiber and lower in sodium.
Cooling down this summer is as healthy as it is delicious when you make watermelon part of your beat-the-heat meal plan. Not only is watermelon a good source of blood pressure-lowering vitamin C and lycopene, research published in the American Journal of Hypertension reveals that patients with prehypertension who added watermelon to their diet significantly reduced their blood pressure.
Tip: Cool and creamy, yogurt is a star ingredient in mineral-rich breakfasts, in sauces and salad dressings, and even in entrées. Most brands of regular yogurt tend to be a bit higher in calcium than Greek varieties, but no matter what type you buy, be sure to stick to low-sugar varieties free of flavorings. (Keep things interesting with these 8 tasty yogurt toppings.)
They may not be great for your breath, but when it comes to your blood pressure, onions can’t be beat. Onions are a great source of quercetin, which a study in the British Journal of Nutrition found effective at lowering blood pressure in overweight and obese study subjects suffering from hypertension and pre-hypertension. To make your onions less pungent, try sautéing them in olive oil for a sweeter flavor and a boost of heart-healthy fat.
Making some stuffed peppers for dinner tonight could be the first step on a journey toward a healthier heart and lower blood pressure. Bell peppers are an excellent source of vitamin C, with more of the potent antioxidant than even citrus fruits, which has been shown to improve cardiac function and lower blood pressure. Research published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition reveals that loading up on vitamin C reduced blood pressure by 5 millimeters of mercury in patients with hypertension, making these versatile veggies a smart addition to any meal plan.
Ditching burgers and steak for good is a tall order for meat lovers. But if you can find ways to swap it for chicken more often than not, you’ll be doing yourself a favor. According to the AHA, chicken has less cholesterol and saturated fat than red meats. Seeing as how cholesterol and saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and make heart disease worse, this difference really does matter. Stick to lean, skinless cuts of chicken.
They may not have been a tempting option to you as a kid, but lima beans are a wonder food for anyone trying to get their blood pressure under control. According to research published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, adding beans to your diet can help you get your blood pressure into a healthy range while keeping you full, making you less likely to reach for sugary or salty snacks that can cause your blood pressure to soar.
According to the CDC, a whopping 75 million Americans—that’s nearly 1/3 of the adult population—are struggling with high blood pressure, increasing their risk of heart attack, stroke, and other life-altering health consequences along the way. Skipping the salt and squeezing in some regular workouts can help keep your blood pressure from reaching dangerous levels, but it takes a more proactive approach to keep your blood pressure under control in the long run. While the words “blood pressure-lowering diet” may conjure images of unseasoned egg whites and limp steamed veggies, getting your blood pressure into a healthy range is more than just doable—it can be downright delicious. Start by adding this approved list of blood pressure-lowering foods into your regular routine and watch your numbers go from scary to stellar in no time.
Tip: Cool and creamy, yogurt is a star ingredient in mineral-rich breakfasts, in sauces and salad dressings, and even in entrées. Most brands of regular yogurt tend to be a bit higher in calcium than Greek varieties, but no matter what type you buy, be sure to stick to low-sugar varieties free of flavorings. (Keep things interesting with these 8 tasty yogurt toppings.)
Bananas are one of your best options. As it turns out, foods high in potassium help manage high blood pressure because it can minimize the impact sodium has. The American Heart Association says one medium banana has about 420 milligrams of potassium, which is a significant amount for a relatively small amount of food. The daily recommended potassium intake for adults is 4,700 milligrams, so just one fruit will have you well on your way.
High-fiber whole grains, especially oatmeal, have been linked to lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that just three servings of whole grains a day can decrease your risk of heart disease by 15 percent. Oatmeal for breakfast is a great way to start your day with whole grains. Add whole-wheat bread at lunch and quinoa, barley, or brown rice at dinner
Tip: Cool and creamy, yogurt is a star ingredient in mineral-rich breakfasts, in sauces and salad dressings, and even in entrées. Most brands of regular yogurt tend to be a bit higher in calcium than Greek varieties, but no matter what type you buy, be sure to stick to low-sugar varieties free of flavorings. (Keep things interesting with these 8 tasty yogurt toppings.) 

If you’re a tea lover, then it may be time to ditch traditional black and green varieties and go for hibiscus. A study in the Journal of Nutrition found drinking this type of tea consistently can lower blood pressure over time. The study’s author believes it works because the healthy compounds in the tea work together to keep the blood vessels resistant to damage, EatingWell notes. Since many herbal tea blends contain hibiscus, it shouldn’t be too hard to find one you like. 

Tip: Meat lovers, rejoice! This lean cut provides plenty of meaty flavor and satisfaction without the overload of saturated fat found in fattier types of beef and pork. Cook larger tenderloins (or do several on the grill or in the oven) and store leftovers in the refrigerator or freezer for fast weeknight meals. (Try this pork tenderloin recipe plus 5 ideas for leftovers.)

As if you didn’t need another reason to drink more berry-filled smoothies. A study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found compounds in blueberries protect against high blood pressure. If you’re not a fan of blueberries, these compounds are also found in raspberries, strawberries, and black currents, ScienceDaily reports. The effect was higher in those who ate blueberries over strawberries, though, so choose these if you have the option.
Don’t deprive yourself of dessert just because you’re eager to get your blood pressure under control. A little dark chocolate can go a long way when it comes to lowering those numbers, thanks to its flavonoid content. Flavonoids, a type of plant-based pigment, have been linked to reductions in blood pressure, thanks to their ability to improve endothelial function, according to researchers at the University of Manitoba. Just make sure you’re choosing real dark chocolate for the biggest benefit; foods high in sugar, like most milk chocolate bars, have been linked to an increase in blood pressure by researchers at the New Zealand University of Otago. Reduce your risk of chronic disease even further by discovering and ditching the worst habits for heart health ASAP.
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